Why I won’t sing Happy Birthday to Jesus.

Holiday Schlock.

It is very easy for us as Christians to consider the feast of Christmas as being something less than it really is. It is very easy for us to see the birth of this Child (albeit a special Child) as a singular event in history that has however more to do with gift giving, being generous and kind, and spending time with family and loved ones, than a cosmic event that changes everything eternally.

It is not that gift giving, being generous and kind, and spending time with family and friends is a bad thing (it is obviously not). But do we need a historic event to be the excuse for such demonstrations of these beatitudes? To act as if this feast is simply the remembrance of the events that happened in Bethlehem some 2000 years ago, is to reduce the profound mystery of Jesus Christ’s birth to simply a notable birthday, in the same way that we remember Queen Victoria’s birthday in May, or George Washington’s birthday in February (for our American friends).

Queen Victoria’s, birthday or George Washington’s birthday, or anyone else’s birthday is not a mystery, hidden from the Angels. Men and women throughout the ages have had babies; this is quite natural and normal. However, that the Eternal and Everlasting Son of God, “True God of True God” assumed our mortal and broken nature, “taking the form of servant” in order to save humanity, is indeed an unfathomable mystery brought forth in Love.

This is the point and the wonder: the Nativity in the flesh of our Lord God and Saviour Jesus Christ is the act whereby the Lord of Glory, the Creator of everything visible and invisible “emptied Himself”, becoming as helpless as a newborn child, born in poverty with nowhere to lay His head except a manger of straw. He came this way so that He might be like us in every way (for we are all born helpless, and a majority of our world is born in poverty) and that we might be like Him.

It is the mystery of this blessed event of the Nativity of the Messiah, (and not simply His birthday) that should mark our thanksgiving and praise as Christians. It is the mystery of the Incarnation, and not simply the remembrance of a historical event, that should inspire us to love like Him. It is the mystery of God acting to save humanity by assuming it completely (except for sin), and not His birthday that we should proclaim to a world in desperate need of being saved from violence, poverty, exploitation and ultimately death, the last enemy.

I won’t be singing happy birthday to Jesus at Christmas this year, for my only response to this mystery is to shout “Christ is born! Glorify Him”!

Icon of the Nativity of our Lord