Growing and blooming where you are planted, and the feast of all Saints of North America

We have often heard the sage words of wisdom that encourage us to  “grow and bloom where we are planted”. There’s something universal in this axiom,  that suggests that people have the qualities to achieve some kind of happiness, and realize their potential no matter what  situation they find themselves in. It stands to reason that something like this would  resonate within the pages of scripture: regardless of whether we have been given one or three talents (Mt. 25:14-29), or whether we are Jews or Greeks, slave or free, male or female (Gal. 3:28) or whether we are married or not (1 Cor 7:7-24), the saving work of Christ is offered to all. More to the point, the Kingdom is not dependent on our being in the perfect place, with the perfect possessions, and having the perfect social status.

These examples (and many other illustrations throughout scripture) articulate the basic message to “grow and bloom where you are planted”, as a means of realizing the goal of happiness (or more appropriately, holiness). For the Christian, it drives home the point that he/she grows and blooms by cooperating with our perfect God who helps us through the Holy Spirit.

History has shown us those men women and children who throughout the ages put on Christ, making His life theirs, growing and blooming into His divine likeness by forsaking the fallen world of sin and corruption. Regardless of whether they were Greek or Ukrainian, in monasteries, or churches, cities or farms, whether they were emperors, or beggars, in palaces or concentration camps, they have revealed the riches of God’s love and mercy that stretches into eternity. We have come to know them as holy, as saints.

This is something to consider as we commemorate the Saints of North America.

The history of Orthodoxy in North America (some 200 years old) is but a drop in the ocean when compared to the nations in which Orthodoxy was established. Those who in faith came to this new world seeking a better life, faced incredible odds and challenges that at times made life here intolerable. But this is not to say that in our short history, and despite the overwhelming challenges, there were not those who blossomed as witnesses of Christ’s saving victory.

Some are well-known like St. Herman, and St. Tikhon, and some are less known, like Matushka Olga of Alaska, or Metropolitan Leonty (who are among those who have yet to be formally recognized as saints, but nonetheless are recognized as those who built the Church). But in every case, we see them doing what Christians have been doing throughout the ages, from the day of Pentecost until now. They have proclaimed ”the Good News” of Christ’s victory and our liberation from sin and death, making real His saving work and the free gift of life in the Holy Spirit.

It might be strange to consider that this has been done in places like Brooklyn, NY through St. Raphael (Hawaweeny) and San Francisco, CA through St. John (Maximovitch), or in Dallas TX where they discovered that the body of Archbishop Dmitri (Royster)was incorrupt and even in Winnipeg  through our locally venerated saint Archbishop Arseny (Chahovtsov). Yet if we really have faith that the Holy Spirit has been poured out on all flesh (Joel 2:28  [3:1 LXX]), and the Gospel has been preached to the ends of the universe (Ps. 19:4 [Ps. 18:4 LXX]), then the presence of the saints isn’t something that is simply reserved for distant lands and traditional Christian cultures. Rather, it is a profound proclamation that the fullness of a life lived in the Holy Spirit is possible even here in North America. This is demonstrated by all  those who grew and bloomed in Christ, and like a carpet of flowers, have covered our continent.

The challenge for us is to see (even seek out) those saints who have shone forth in North America.  They took what would have been to them a strange world and culture, making  it as fertile as the richest soil.

In like manner, we are called to live as they did: loving everyone, speaking peace, being patience and kind, offering good works, remaining faithful, gentle, and selfless (see Gal. 5:22-23). We are called to grow and bloom here in Manitoba, Canada, North America, and bear the fruits of eternal life.

By the prayers of all those saints known and unknown who blossomed in North America, may we be strengthened in this.

Looking to the saints. Becoming saints.

 

There are those moments that confront us now and again, that call into question why we do what we do as Orthodox Christians. How do we know that our prayers mean something, or that our sacrifice of praise at Church on Sunday is not some pantomime to make us feel important and special? How do we know that the faith handed down from generation to generation is divine and full of grace, made manifest by the Holy Spirit? In short, how do we know we are the Church?

Some of the answers to these kinds of questions are found the scriptures: the witness of a God who acts to save humanity from sin and ultimately death. That, along with holy tradition (the context in which we understand scripture and participate in the mysteries of God’s saving work), help humanity understand who God is, who Jesus Christ is and what is the Gospel; and by extension help us understand why we are Christians.

But as scripture can come across as “dead words” or a cultural artifact of a bygone era (as I have been told many times), and holy tradition can be misunderstood as simply the “laws of man”, and can come across as abstract concepts of data to process, and customs to follow, it is the men, women and children who have immersed themselves in scripture, and confessed Christ, who stand out as lights that bear witness to a living faith.

It is one thing to read about God. It is a completely other thing to encounter those who have been transformed and transfigured by God, by the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. These are the saints.

From the greatest saint to the least, from those universally known (like St. Nicholas) to those known only to God, the saints are men, women and children who have striven to conquer the challenges of everyday life, fear, injustice, strife and violence, poverty and even death by marking every element of their lives with the love of God who Himself conquered all this by His passion and life-giving death on the cross.

This is something to consider as we bask in the warmth of Pentecost celebrated a week ago. For the saints are those who received the Holy Spirit, God Himself, as if mystically in the upper room on that holy Pentecost after the Lord’s Resurrection, and by the Holy Spirit demonstrated the power of scripture by living it, and manifesting the victory won by Christ by participating with Him, and bearing witness to the love of God poured out on all humanity. By the Spirit, they were (and are) those who confessed that love is stronger than hate, peace stronger than violence, long-suffering stronger than striking, kindness stronger than ambivalence, goodness stronger than wickedness, faithfulness stronger than fear, and self-control stronger than selfishness (Gal 5:22-23).

If their was any question about why we do what we do, the saints make real our purpose by showing us that it is “the Fathers good pleasure to give (us) the kingdom” (Lk. 12:32)

Maybe the questions should be: Do I pray and offer good works like a saint who in his or her love for humanity, makes real the love of God? Do I offer my sacrifice of praise like a saint, who even in death can offer thanksgiving to a God who defeats death by death and shares His victory of eternal life with us? Will I hand down to my family and friends a living faith and inheritance that bears witness to God’s saving work throughout the ages? In short, will I make real the Pentecostal miracle like a saint, and confess that Jesus is the Christ, who abides in us, that we might abide in Him (see 1 Jn. 4:15), and that no “height or depth nor any other created thing, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Rm. 8:39)?

Father Bob’s Wisdom. The Meeting of the Lord (2009)

Meeting of the Lord

This feast, celebrated on February 2, is known in the Orthodox Church as The Presentation of Christ in the Temple. Another name for the feast is The Meeting of our Lord. Roman Catholic and Protestant Christians call the feast, The Purification of the Holy Virgin. About 450 AD in Jerusalem, people began the custom of holding lighted candles during the Divine Liturgy of this feast day. Therefore, some churches in the West refer to this holy day as Candlemas or the Liturgy of the Candles. The Feast of the Presentation concludes the observances related to the Nativity of Christ, a period that opened on November 15 with the beginning of the Nativity fast.

The story of the Presentation is told in St. Luke’s Gospel which we just read. Mary and Joseph were faithful Jews and observed their religious customs. An important custom was for the couple to take their first-born son to the Temple. The baby was taken to the Temple forty days after his birth and was dedicated to God. In addition, if the parents were wealthy, they were to bring a lamb and a young pigeon or a turtle dove to be offered as a sacrifice at the Temple. The custom provided that if the parents were poor, they were to offer two pigeons or two turtle doves for the sacrifice.

When Jesus was forty days old, Mary and Joseph took Him to the Temple in Jerusalem. They were not wealthy, so they took two turtle doves with them to offer as a sacrifice at the Temple. As they arrived at the Temple, Mary and Joseph were met by a very old man named Simeon. He was a holy man and was noted as a very intelligent scholar. Simeon spent much time studying about the prophets of Israel. It was during his studies that he learned of the coming of the Messiah. The Jewish people were waiting for the Messiah to come and deliver Israel from their conquerors. From that time on, Simeon spent his time praying for the Messiah to come. He spent many years in prayer. Finally, while Simeon was praying he heard the voice of God. God promised Simeon that he would not die until he had seen the Messiah.

He who gave the Law to Moses on Mount Sinai now comes to us in the flesh and submits himself to the requirements of this law, not because He needs to, but to show that He is truly one of us in his humanity.

When Simeon saw Jesus, he took the baby in his arms and blessed the Lord and said: “Lord, now let Your servant go in peace according to Your promise, because my eyes have seen Your salvation which you have prepared before the face of all peoples, a light to bring revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory to your people Israel.” Part of the reason that Simeon can depart now is that the old covenant with its priesthood has passed away, and on this 40th day, our Great High Priest, Jesus Christ, who is the offerer and who is offered, who is the receiver and the received now replaces the Old Testament priesthood which is no longer in effect, no longer necessary.

Also, in the Temple was Anna the Prophetess. She had been a widow for many years. Anna was about eighty-four years old and spent her time in the Temple worshiping, fasting, and praying. When she saw the Christ Child she praised God and spoke of him to all who were awaiting the Messiah.

After Jesus was presented in the Temple, the family returned to Galilee to the town of Nazareth. The Bible tells us that Jesus grew and became strong, and was filled with wisdom.

The Holy Icon of this feast shows that the meeting takes place inside the Temple and in front of the altar. The altar has a book or a scroll on it and is covered by a canopy. The Theotokos stands to the left and is holding out her hands in a gesture of offering. She has just handed her Son to Simeon.

Christ is shown as a child, but He is not in swaddling clothes. He is clothed in a small dress and his legs are bare. Jesus appears to be giving a blessing. Simeon holds Jesus with both hands which are covered. This shows the reverence Simeon had for the Messiah. Simeon is bare headed and there is nothing to show that he is a priest. Some biblical scholars say that Simeon was probably a priest of the Temple or a Doctor of the Law.

Joseph is behind the Theotokos. He is carrying the two turtle doves for the sacrifice. Anna the Prophetess is also standing behind the Theotokos and is pointing to the Christ child.

The words Simeon spoke when he saw the Christ Child are known as “St. Simeon’s Prayer.” This prayer is sung every day at the evening Vespers services of the Church. I believe that in some western churches this prayer is sung at some funerals, where it is of course, quite appropriate.

In the Orthodox Church, both baby boys and baby girls are taken to the Church on the fortieth day after their birth. This is done in remembrance of the Theotokos and Joseph taking the infant Jesus to the Temple.

We too, bless candles before our Divine Liturgy today. They are beautiful lights. We have to be careful in handling them because we are not accustomed to using them in our daily lives. We burn candles in our churches and homes before our icons as a sign of reverence towards those depicted in the icon. The candles also signify our unending prayer going up to the Lord. It is not sufficient just to light a candle—it is the prayer behind the candle which is important. Even if we somehow had no candles available, the prayer could still be offered of course.

The faithful will take these candles home and use them on special occasions and in their prayers. Strictly speaking, it would be good if all the candles we used throughout the year were blessed in the Church. I have heard of people in other places lighting a blessed candle in their home during a storm. Again, the blessed candles are not magic—God willing, as we light a candle in our homes during a time like that, our prayers are going up to the Lord just as the smoke and light from the candle is ascending.

The candles are of course also reflections of Jesus Christ who is the Light of the world. But the light from the candles can remind us that we too must be lights to others in all our lives. The light that we show forth in our day to day living is even more powerful than the light of a candle—it has much more horsepower or candle power. How we live our daily lives in relationship to God and to our fellow human being is the greatest sermon ever preached.

While it sounds awesome that this old man should hold God Incarnate in his elderly arms, it is no less awesome that we, too, receive God Incarnate and Resurrected, Christ our God in our bodies as we partake of His Holy Body and Precious Blood at Holy communion.

This grief of hope.

Igumen John (Scratch)

Igumen John (Scratch)

This past week has always been a challenge for me and for my family as we remember the passing of both my parents. My mother (Matushka Suzanne Scratch) passed away some 19 years ago on the 10th of January, and my father (Igumen John Scratch) 11 years ago on the 15th . By the Lord’s mercy there is a visible sign of their unity in the timing which they were called. Despite the loss of my parents before their golden years, before they could ever enjoy the blessing of all their grandchildren and great-grandchildren, my grief changed over the years.

In one respect their loss has become easier, less of a burden for me. Time passes; life goes on. Families, work, and the world bring many challenges and blessings that fill the void of such a profound and untimely loss.

It is not as though I do not grieve that mom and dad are not here to see how my children are growing into beautiful and caring people. (My goodness where has the time gone!) I do. But I am comforted by the fact that my children are turning out as they are because of their grandparents’ prayers and intercessions.

It is not as though I do not grieve that mom and dad are not here to give me guidance and advice as I raise a family and serve a community. I do. But I am comforted by the fact that they also struggled to take up their crosses daily (Lk.9:23) in raising a family and serving a community. We are now bearing the fruits of their labours.

It is not as though I do not miss the unconditional love they offered me and many others. I do; and I am comforted that their love for me, for my family and all those whom they encountered, is perfected in the presence of and in response to a loving God who first loved (them) and us (1 Jn. 4:19).

The grief that now fills my heart is a Godly grief that produces hope (2 Cor. 7:10): one of having received a gift that reveals its treasures and blessings in every moment of my life (whether I am paying attention or not); one of having received a gift which builds up and strengthens, brings light and hope; one of having received a full life from my parents, made whole and complete in the saving victory of Jesus Christ. All the while, I know that I am not worthy of such an inheritance of their love, and that I could never offer anything in repayment except my thanksgiving to God.

It has taken me years to see this context in something that hurts so personally. For thanksgiving is the realization that one has been given something one did not have, nor could get independently. This grief of hope looks forward in gratitude, reflecting on what it has received; It declares generosity while confessing one’s poverty. This grief of hope heals our broken hearts through the bitterness of our tears. It is the natural reaction to being loved, even the love of those who have passed away. Maybe that is what makes it so difficult.

Sadly I have forgotten the sound of my parents’ voices, and detailed experiences with them have become impressions and moments. Yet even as the sands of time have eroded details of those memories, the love my parents gave me, my siblings, and family (and not just biological ones) has not been diminished or even swallowed up in death.

The love offered by my parents has been sanctified by the Lord in His love for humanity, reclaiming us by His voluntary assent and death on the Cross, a love made tangible in our descent into the waters of baptism.

The love offered by our departed grandparents, great-grandparents, brothers and sisters, children and friends, is made holy by the Lord’s love that redeems our broken and mortal nature in His Resurrection. This love made tangible profoundly for us, when we are raised up from the baptismal font.

Profoundly, the love offered by people by throughout all the ages is seen to be participating in His pure love, participating in and united with the Source of all love. The Grace of the Holy Spirit fulfills and renews the power of this love in Christians on the feast of Pentecost.

The love offered by my mother and father and all those departed souls around us, has taught us about the Lord’s love, and it is the Lord’s love that has changed the bitter tears of grief over their deaths to warm tears of thanksgiving for His mercy, and my mother and father’s love.

“For since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, through Jesus, God will bring with Him those who have fallen asleep” (1Thess 4:13).

MAY THEIR MEMORY BE ETERNAL.

Matushka Suzanne Scratch and her little Scratchlings.

Matushka Suzanne Scratch and her little Scratchlings.

Blessing the Red River.

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Why would you bless the Red River?
I was asked this a few weeks ago, and my response was “because it needs it”.
This river (especially), all rivers, oceans, seas, lakes, streams and springs have for generations provided water, food and transportation; being cornerstones of civilization, and life. They sadly have also become a toilet (literally) for waste, sewage, chemicals, and even human misery. These waters, that were once sources of life, are now blights that mask and disfigure the importance of water in our lives. No one will ever confuse the a nice glass of water from your tap and the water that runs through Winnipeg. In this context it is not a far stretch to see some sort of connection between what our water has become, and the plight of humanity.
Like the water that courses through our rivers, humanity was meant to be a source of love, mercy and grace; to be life. Our humanity created to be robed in righteousness, (Isa. 61:10) has become  masked by the rags of sin. Where once it brought life and hope, it now brings decay and sickness and even death. For this reason the Lord acts to save us, becoming like us in every way (except sin) even dying on the cross that he might restore and renew our polluted and stained nature.
That as the Lord of Glory descends into our polluted and sinful humanity, and by the cross restores humanities’ vocation to be life bearing, we bless even our most polluted waters, commending their water to His saving and purifying grace.
The Red River needs to be blessed, in the same way we need to be saved. That we, like those waters that have cultivated life throughout the ages, might cultivate real life, now and in the age to come.
At 2:00 pm tomorrow (Saturday Jan 7th), we will be blessing the Red River at the end of Magnus Ave. at Prichard park. Not the Redwood boat launch (way to much snow there).
There is parking on the street, and  a few pathways down to the river, without having to scamper down a embankment.
Not to worry we won’t be venturing out to far on the ice.
This service is not for the faint at heart, or those who don’t like the cold, so please dress in layers!
As many come are invited by to the Scratches  to warm up after the service

Dec. 26th Liturgy canceled

Dearest all.

Christ is Born! Glorify Him!

We all love a white Christmas, but when it is expected to exceed 25 cm it can be a bit to much. So I thought it best that we cancel the service tomorrow (Dec. 26th).

The Henderson Hwy, can be a little touch and go at times, not to mention any snow fall can make a normal half hour trip feel like a journey to Steinbach.

Have a blessed feast of the Nativity of our Lord God and Saviour Jesus Christ, shovel well tomorrow, and enjoy your families.

See you on Saturday evening for Vespers and prayers for the new year.

 

Why I won’t sing Happy Birthday to Jesus.

Holiday Schlock.

It is very easy for us as Christians to consider the feast of Christmas as being something less than it really is. It is very easy for us to see the birth of this Child (albeit a special Child) as a singular event in history that has however more to do with gift giving, being generous and kind, and spending time with family and loved ones, than a cosmic event that changes everything eternally.

It is not that gift giving, being generous and kind, and spending time with family and friends is a bad thing (it is obviously not). But do we need a historic event to be the excuse for such demonstrations of these beatitudes? To act as if this feast is simply the remembrance of the events that happened in Bethlehem some 2000 years ago, is to reduce the profound mystery of Jesus Christ’s birth to simply a notable birthday, in the same way that we remember Queen Victoria’s birthday in May, or George Washington’s birthday in February (for our American friends).

Queen Victoria’s, birthday or George Washington’s birthday, or anyone else’s birthday is not a mystery, hidden from the Angels. Men and women throughout the ages have had babies; this is quite natural and normal. However, that the Eternal and Everlasting Son of God, “True God of True God” assumed our mortal and broken nature, “taking the form of servant” in order to save humanity, is indeed an unfathomable mystery brought forth in Love.

This is the point and the wonder: the Nativity in the flesh of our Lord God and Saviour Jesus Christ is the act whereby the Lord of Glory, the Creator of everything visible and invisible “emptied Himself”, becoming as helpless as a newborn child, born in poverty with nowhere to lay His head except a manger of straw. He came this way so that He might be like us in every way (for we are all born helpless, and a majority of our world is born in poverty) and that we might be like Him.

It is the mystery of this blessed event of the Nativity of the Messiah, (and not simply His birthday) that should mark our thanksgiving and praise as Christians. It is the mystery of the Incarnation, and not simply the remembrance of a historical event, that should inspire us to love like Him. It is the mystery of God acting to save humanity by assuming it completely (except for sin), and not His birthday that we should proclaim to a world in desperate need of being saved from violence, poverty, exploitation and ultimately death, the last enemy.

I won’t be singing happy birthday to Jesus at Christmas this year, for my only response to this mystery is to shout “Christ is born! Glorify Him”!

Icon of the Nativity of our Lord

 

 

+ Archimandrite Alexander.

Fr. Alexander and myself having a conversation at the Archdiocesan Assembly in Victoria in 2010

Fr. Alexander and myself having a conversation at the Archdiocesan Assembly in Victoria in 2010

On Saturday night I usually pack my pipe and go for a walk to fine-tune and shape my sermon, in an attempt to avoid rambling on and on (as I am prone to do). That morning I had been informed about the sudden repose of Archimandrite Alexander (Dennis Pihach), and it had weighed heavily on my heart throughout the day. I was working on my sermon about St. Tikhon (whose feast day of glorification it was this past Sunday), yet every time I would go over my sermon, I would get lost in thoughts of Fr. Alexander. I would re-focus and get back to my sermon only to slip back into thoughts about Fr. Alexander.

This went on for a bit (well, two hours) as I considered the many humble works St. Tikhon did in this country and province: serving immigrants from Ukraine, preaching the Good News, building churches, babysitting children while their families were in the fields, or helping push wagons out of the mud – all for the Glory a God. then it dawned on me that Fr. Alexander not only continued this work, but also was transition between the world of St. Tikhon and our 21st century Canadian culture; between a culture steeped in a millennium of Christianity, and a world thirsting for meaning; between a cultural Orthodox tradition, and the convert experience.

He always gave honour to the blessed gift of Orthodoxy, the inheritance of those saints and pioneers who brought with them the “Faith once delivered to the saints” (Jude 3).

Whether it was taking young converts with him to bless homes in rural Manitoba for Old Calendar Theophany, immersing them in the festive life of the Church as lived out in the homes of the faithful, or giving a feast for the servers of the Cathedral in Ottawa on the occasion of his Namesday, and serving at the OCA representation Church in Moscow (a Bukovinian boy from the prairies in Moscow, -how is that for irony); or whether it was his willingness to be “all things to all men that some might be saved” (1 Cor. 9:22 ) applying the fluidity of the Gospel that witnessed the saving love of Christ, and not simply moral piety: he worked to help others find a their way as Orthodox Christians within a culture that gave no room for either tradition, or conversion.

This was truly his witness and his suffering. To some he was  a traitor, and to others a one-track- minded traditionalist, but to myself and to many in the Archdiocese of Canada, he was a voice of reason and clarity.

It was not that Fr. Alexander re-invented Orthodoxy, or that he  made it a new, purer expression of Christianity, or that he crystalized the life of the Church into some relic of distant lands and ages. What he did was continually to bear witness to the living Faith: the love of God the Father, in His only begotten Son Jesus Christ, through the Holy Spirit, made real in the Church, regardless if it was expressed in Slavonic, Ukrainian, English or French, served on the old or new Calendar, or in full or abbreviated services.

His legacy will not simply be the men, women and families that he brought closer to Christ, or the men he inspired to serve at Christ’s Altar (myself included); or the churches he built, and the parishes he healed. Rather, like St. Tikhon’s legacy, the seal of his legacy is that he cultivated the hearts of the faithful that they might hear the voice of the Shepherd, Christ our God, calling each of us to peace, mercy and grace in a very turbulent and trying time.

The question now for us is  what do we do? how do we serve? What do we proclaim? Do we cultivate the world around us to hear our own voices, or the voice of the one Shepherd who calls us by name? Is it our own word that we bear witness to, or the divine Word, who breathed the Holy Spirit upon all creation?

If we are true to the work of St. Tikhon and holy men and women who have served the Lord in Canada (like our beloved Archbishop Arseny); and if we are true to the memory of Fr. Alexander, our proclamation will be of the Lord’s saving mercy poured out onto a new land, a proclamation that cutting through the noise of sin so that the hear voice of God calling us to life eternal.

May His memory be eternal.

Thanksgiving, being thankful and being Eucharistic.

We thank you O Lord.

Everything has a value and price, especially our actions and relationships. But when the worth of those elements becomes a commodity,  there is the temptation to lose the distinction between gifts and transactions, between personal relationships and legal agreements. Even in the context of this holiday, we can some times fail to differentiate between being thankful, Eucharistic or being selfish.

A life in Christ is primarily one of thanksgiving. Even the most important service that makes real the totality of God’s saving work, the Divine Liturgy, is called the Eucharist (this word means thanksgiving in Greek).

Yet it is so easy for us to lose sight of this, when we are distracted by the world’s workings and ways the result of which is a total independence from the divine and from the neighbour. And who could blame us for losing that perspective? In a world of so much plenty and abundance and yet so much poverty and violence, it is almost impossible to see this life of thanksgiving as being anything more than sentimental and wishful.

Yet it is precisely because of these faults, and the lie that we can live independently of God and neighbour, that our loving and patient Lord acts to eternally save us. He who fed the multitudes in the wilderness and offered thanksgiving to God, and He who offered himself on the Cross for our sakes, makes a mockery of the selfish and fearful, by giving His life to each and every one of us a priceless list.

To be thankful (through the eyes of faith) is to see the Lord’s triumph and victory over fear and selfishness, over poverty and violence, and ultimately over death in everything we do. There is more to thanksgiving than a plate of turkey and pumpkin pie, a warm house, family and friends (not that those are bad). There is the undying love of  a God who offers us the gift of eternal life, and not a trade of services and goods: a God who searches for us as the Good Shepherd, and even gives His life for us. This is and not a contract with incentives.

The scripture, our prayer, our services, all help us realize this gift. But it is a holiday like Thanksgiving that brings being thankful to the fore of our hearts and minds, and presents us with an opportunity to reclaim the perspective of what it is to be thankful, not just at this time of year, but in every aspect of our lives.

May the Holy Spirit guide our hearts to be thankful in our whole lives, to be Eucharistic, so we can offer ourselves in thanksgiving to the world around us, in Christ Jesus, by the Holy Spirit, to the glory of God the Father. Offering gifts of love and sacrifice, as the Lord has done for each and everyone of us, may we be enabled thus to make real the saving love of God to family, friends and strangers.